Columbus Construction Litigation Attorney

No matter how much a property owner researches his or her options before hiring a contractor to tackle a construction or remodeling project, there will be times when the work performed is unsatisfactory. If you cannot reach an agreement with the contractor on how to resolve the issue, it is time to enlist the services of a knowledgeable construction law attorney who will fight for you.

Ben Wright is a dynamic construction law attorney who is uniquely qualified to protect your interests and advocate on your behalf. Ben is a licensed civil engineer with experience as a construction supervisor. That, combined with his extensive knowledge of construction contracts, building codes, construction documents and insurance, allows him to accurately assess the quality of work performed and determine whether promised results were delivered.

Representation In A Wide Array Of Construction Litigation

Ben represents individuals in Columbus and throughout central Ohio in the full spectrum of residential and commercial construction law disputes, including:

  • Construction defect claims
  • Negligent construction
  • Water infiltration
  • Accidents
  • Construction delay claims
  • Mechanic's liens
  • Artisan liens
  • Insurance coverage disputes

Ben has successfully resolved construction and contract litigation cases for clients in a wide range of disputes. A summary of his relevant cases in construction litigation and other practice areas can be found here.

His ability to build strong cases allows him to negotiate from a position of strength. If a fair agreement cannot be reached through negotiation, Ben is prepared to pursue compensation through litigation. His background in the field and his meticulous attention to detail serve him well in the courtroom.

A Consultation Is The First Step To Resolving Your Dispute

If you are unsatisfied with construction or remodeling work, the first step to resolving your issue is to contact Ben Wright, an experienced construction defects and contract dispute lawyer. Use the contact form on this website or call 614-285-3383 to make an appointment.

"Mr. Wright was recommended by a mutual friend. . . . His advice led us to better results which made us feel more comfortable with our decision. ...There is no doubt that he is trustworthy. Mr. Wright is an excellent attorney!" Kerry

"The legal work that attorney Ben Wright provided for me had to do with . . . construction related issues . . . . This work was done in a very timely and professional manner and I was very satisfied with the way he accomplished this. . . . I would highly recommend Ben to others for any legal services that they may need. Ben has done additional work for me in the past and I was very satisfied with those results as well." William

FAQ

  1. Q: Do I have to use a licensed contractor on my construction project?
  2. Q: What is a mechanic's lien?
  3. Q: There is a lien on my property. Do I have to pay the lien?
  4. Q: What happens if I do not pay a lien?
  5. Q: Can a contractor bill me for more than the written estimate?
  6. Q: Is an oral construction contract legally valid?
  7. Q: How can I find a good contractor?
  8. Q: What questions should I ask before hiring a contractor?
  9. Q: What documents should I get before I hire a contractor?

Q: Do I have to use a licensed contractor on my construction project?

A: Licensing rules vary from place-to-place, but generally it is wise to only work with a licensed contractor. Construction done by a person not licensed as a contractor may not pass inspection.

Q: What is a mechanic's lien?

A: A mechanic's lien is a claim against a building or property to secure payment. The lien makes the property owner ultimately responsible for paying the contractor, subcontractor or materialman – regardless of whether the owner has already paid the prime contractor or direct contractor in full. A lien can result when the prime contractor has not paid subcontractors, laborers or suppliers. Legally, the property owner is ultimately responsible for payment — even if the owner has already paid the direct contractor.

Q: There is a lien on my property. Do I have to pay the lien?

A: It depends. There are several technical requirements for a lien to be valid. If there is a lien on your property, you should consult a lawyer to see if it is valid before paying.

Q: What happens if I do not pay a lien?

A: If the lien is valid, the lienholder may go to court to get an order enforcing the lien. A lien can lead to a foreclosure, forcing the sale of the property in lieu of compensation. Liens can also be problematic if you try to sell or refinance your home.

Q: Can a contractor bill me for more than the written estimate?

A: Generally, yes. An estimate is just a contractor's guess as to the price. But there are limits. If a contractor is charging you more than you think is fair, you should speak with a lawyer to evaluate whether you have a claim for fraud against the contractor.

Q: Is an oral construction contract legally valid?

A: Yes, if the technical requirements for a contract are met. Regardless of its validity, an oral contract is generally a bad idea. There are too many opportunities for misunderstandings. Both parties are better off with a clearly written document that sets out each party's rights and responsibilities.

Q: How can I find a good contractor?

A: Fifteen ways to find a good contractor:

  1. Hire a lawyer to negotiate and draft a binding contract.
  2. A good contractor will not try to rush a homeowner to start work immediately.
  3. Some bad contractors will inspect the property and claim work must start immediately.
  4. If a consumer is in need of a loan, a predatory contractor may insist a certain lender. Shop around for your own loan.
  5. Be aware of a contractor who seeks you out.
  6. Get several estimates and review them carefully to see if the same or different work will be done, and what quality of materials are to be used.
  7. Ask for references and call the references.
  8. Check with the Better Business Bureau for any complaints or comments.
  9. Do not pay anything more than a reasonable deposit upfront, and get a receipt.
  10. Do not agree to make final payment before being satisfied that the job has been done.
  11. Keep ten percent of the project price as retainage to be paid one to six months following completion of the project to ensure that there are no problems with the work.
  12. Be sure your contract states who is responsible for getting necessary work permits and who pays for them-and make sure they have been obtained.
  13. Inspect the job as it proceeds. If you are not comfortable inspecting the job, hire an architect to do so for you.
  14. If problems develop with the job get the help from a person with repair experience or with home or code inspection experience, such as an architect.
  15. Don't sign a contract containing blanks. If there are blanks, insert "N/A" (not applicable) or cross through any blanks.

Q: What questions should I ask before hiring a contractor?

A: Six questions you should ask before hiring a contractor:

  1. Under what circumstances can the price for the work be changed from the estimate?
  2. How soon will the work start?
  3. When will the work be completed?
  4. Is the contractor licensed, and by whom? Call and verify what you are told.
  5. Is the contractor insured?
  6. Are the workers covered by workers' compensation insurance?

Q: What documents should I get before I hire a contractor?

A: Five documents you should get before hiring a contractor:

  1. A written estimate
  2. A written contract
  3. A copy of the contractor’s license
  4. A copy of the contractor’s bond
  5. A copy of the contractor’s insurance declarations page